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An American in Paris
Music and Lyrics by George Gershwin and Ira Gershwin
Book by Craig Lucas
Directed and Choreographed by Christopher Wheeldon
The Fox Theatre
January 18, 2017

Garen Scribner, Sara Esty Photo by Matthew Murphy An American in Paris North American Tour

Garen Scribner, Sara Esty
Photo by Matthew Murphy
An American in Paris North American Tour

I have to admit that although I saw the classic film An American in Paris, starring Gene Kelly, when I was a small child, what I most remember about it is being somewhat confused and bored by the iconic dance sequence that ends the movie. I guess I was too young to appreciate it. Now, the tour of the stage version with the classic Gershwin score and a revised book is on stage at the Fox, and viewing the story and its dazzling dance sequences as an adult, I’m anything but bored and confused. Although the story has been modified somewhat from the film, this production is visually stunning, emotionally stirring and musically sensational.

The setting, as the title suggests, is Paris. The time is just after the end of World War II. Jerry Mulligan (Garen Scribner) is a young US Army vet and aspiring painter who finds himself intrigued with the City of Light and with a mysterious young woman that he meets but whose name he doesn’t learn at first. He decides to stay in Paris and wanders into a cafe where he meets fellow American veteran Adam Hochberg (Etai Benson), who plays the piano and writes music, hoping to become a successful composer. He also meets Henri Baurel (Nick Spangler), the son of wealthy French manufacturers, who harbors the secret dream of becoming a song-and-dance man in America. Eventually, they cross paths with Jerry’s mystery woman, the gifted young ballerina Lise Dassin (Sara Esty), whose mother had been a famous dancer. Lise herself has a secret that ties her to Henri, although both Jerry and Adam find themselves drawn to her and she herself feels drawn to Jerry.  There’s also wealthy heiress and arts patron Milo Davenport (Emily Ferranti), who forms an attachment to Jerry as well. All the complicated love polygons are only part of the plot, as the ghosts of the past and the spirit of the future battle within the various characters who strive to make something of their lives, and the world, after the war. It’s a well-constructed plot that revises and fleshes out some of the stories from the film, adding extra Gershwin songs in a celebration of life, art, and ultimately hope.

This is such a dance-heavy show that I have to mention that director/choreographer Christopher Wheeldon’s wonderful, lyrical work here. The strong influences of ballet, jazz, and occasionally tap are here in evidence, expertly, energetically, and emotionally danced by the top-notch ensemble and perfectly cast leads. The cast is ably led by Scribner as the outgoing, charming Jerry and Esty as the somewhat mysterious, conflicted Lise.  Their chemistry is outstanding, and their dancing is simply wondrous, especially in the dazzling “An American in Paris” ballet near the end of the show. There are also strong performances from Benson as the sweetly snarky Adam and Ferranti in a witty, sympathetic performance as Milo. Spangler as Henri is also excellent, making the most of a spectacular showcase production number in “I’ll Build a Stairway to Paradise”. The whole cast here is incredibly strong, showing of incredible dancing skills on such Gershwin classics as “I Got Rhythm”, “S’Wonderful”, and more.

Technically, this show is just plain beautiful. Bob Crowley’s glorious set design is remarkable in its simplicity and its elegance, relying largely on movable set pieces that flow onstage as if they are part of the dance, augmented by truly stunning projections by 59 Productions. Crowley also designed the gorgeous, stylish costumes that add much to the 1940’s air of the production. There’s also spectacular, atmospheric lighting by Natasha Katz that enhances every scene and production number.

This is such a wonderful show. It’s poetic, balletic, and dramatic with just the right amount of humor to move the story along. The characters are well portrayed and their stories are convincing, but what is mostly evident about this production is its celebration of life, art, and music in a visual, auditory, and emotional sense. It’s a screen-to-stage adaptation that honors its source material and manages to expand it in a richly compelling way, and it fills the Fox stage superbly.  It’s definitely a show not to be missed. Now, I need to see the movie again.

Cast of An American in Paris Photo by Matthew Murphy An American in Paris North American Tour

Cast of An American in Paris
Photo by Matthew Murphy
An American in Paris North American Tour

The North American tour of An American In Paris runs at the Fox Theatre until January 29, 2017.

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