Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘debby lennon’

Songs for Nobodies
by Joanna Murray-Smith
Directed by Pamela Hunt
Max & Louie Productions
January 24, 2020

Debby Lennon
Photo by John Lamb
Max & Louie Productions

Max & Louie Productions has had a lot of success with Debby Lennon front and center, and their latest production is no different. Songs For Nobodies is a one-woman show featuring the stories of five “ordinary” women and their encounters with five legendary performers of the 20th Century, featuring a variety of musical styles from classic pop standards, to country, to jazz, to classical. It seems an ideal vehicle for the talented, vocally versatile Lennon, and she and the show do not disappoint.

This isn’t one story, but five, highlighting the larger-than-life talents of legendary singers Judy Garland, Patsy Cline, Edith Piaf, Billie Holiday, and Maria Callas, as told from the points of view of five different women who had memorable meetings with one of the five. There’s restroom attendant Beatrice Ethel Appleton, who encounters Garland while on the job at a swanky New York hotel and receives some comfort and advice in a difficult time. There’s also Pearl Avalon, whose meeting with Cline (at what would turn out to be the singer’s last performance) inspired her future career as a backup singer for some of country music’s greatest stars. We also meet Edie Delamotte, an English librarian who remembers her father’s fateful meeting with Piaf during World War II, as well as Too Junior Jones, an ambitious New York reporter who gets an interview with Holiday. Finally, Irish nanny Orla McDonagh recounts her run-in with Callas–and Aristotle Onassis–on a luxury yacht. The overall point seems to be highlighting the music of the famous singers, while also showing their impact on “everyday” women in more “mundane” non-celebrity positions, while also in its own way showing the humanity of iconic figures who are often remembered more by their public image. So, while some of these women may be “nobodies” and some are world-renowned, the underlying point is that everyone is somebody.

The one-woman show nature of this piece makes casting a crucial matter, and Max & Louie’s creative team have chosen their “go-to” MVP, Lennon, for this challenging task. The choice is unsurprising considering Lennon’s already proven talent, both in terms of acting and her remarkable voice. She gets a chance to show off all of her considerable skills here, from giving us unique characterizations of all of the “ordinary women” that require her to employ several different accents and play different ages, to getting to perform a “greatest hits” array of songs associated with the five legendary singers–such as “Come Rain or Come Shine” for Garland, “Crazy” for Cline, “Non, Je Regrette Rien” for Piaf, “Strange Fruit” for Holiday, and Puccini’s “Vissi d’arte” for Callas. This is an impressively wide range of styles, and Lennon delivers each song with remarkable versatility.  Overall, each segment has its own humor, drama, and poignancy, although for me the standout was the Piaf segment, both for Lennon’s uncannily accurate singing and for the power of the story itself.

Technically, the show is remarkable in its stylish simplicity. There are no costume or makeup changes, and Lennon–outfitted by costume designer Dorothy Jones in a simple black dress–relies on the strength of her own acting to show the changes in characters, with occasional use of accessories such as scarf and sunglasses for Callas, a glass of whiskey for Holiday, a black shawl for Piaf. Dunsi Dai’s elegant set, Kevin Bowman’s projections, and Stellie Siteman’s props contribute much to the mood, as well. There’s also excellent atmospheric work from lighting designer Tony Anselmo, proficient sound from Phillip Evans, and an excellent musical ensemble led by music director and pianist Nicolas Valdez and featuring Jake Stergos on bass and Keith Bowman on percussion.

Songs for Nobodies is a “showcase” kind of show, for its iconic celebrity subjects, for their “ordinary counterparts” and, especially because of its structure, for the show’s featured star. Here, Debby Lennon gets to remind audiences of her memorable talents, and Max & Louie Productions gets to produce another remarkable performance. If you love these artists and their music, and especially if you love to experience the power of live performance, this is a show to see, and hear.

 

Debby Lennon
Photo by John Lamb
Max & Louie Productions

Max & Louie Productions is presenting Songs for Nobodies at the Kranzberg Theatre until February 2, 2020

Read Full Post »

Love, Linda
Music and Lyrics by Cole Porter
Book by Stevie Holland, with Gary William Friedman
Arrangements and Additional Music by Gary William Friedman
Directed by Ken Page
Max & Louie Productions
January 19. 2019

Debby Lennon
Photo by John Lamb
Max & Louie Productions

The latest show from Max & Louie Productions is essentially a showcase for its leading performer. Debby Lennon, who has memorably appeared in previous shows from the company, is cast as the wife of legendary songwriter Cole Porter in a slight but entertaining production that especially highlights Lennon’s always impressive vocal talents and stage presence.

This is really more of a narrated concert than a play, co-written by a jazz singer and the show’s original performer. This is a show that, basically, gives a talented singer a chance to shine, showcasing the classic hits of one of Broadway’s most legendary songwriters. Lennon portrays Linda Lee Thomas, who was married to Porter for 34 years. She tells the story of her life before she met Porter, including her marriage to her abusive first husband, but the bulk of the production focuses on her complicated relationship with her second husband, Porter. Their love and mutual dependence on one another–in different ways–is made clear, as is the truth that Linda married him in full knowledge that he was gay. In between songs, Lennon tells vivid stories of her life with Porter in Paris in the 1920s, and then in New York, and eventually, Hollywood, as she outlines Porter’s rise to fame, their celebrity connections, and Porter’s many relationships with men and her struggles with jealousy. It’s an interesting story, compellingly portrayed by Lennon, but it’s all essentially a framework for the songs, which are the show’s–and Lennon’s–strength. Many well-known and lesser-known Porter songs are featured, allowing Lennon to show off a different style of vocals than usual. Her past efforts for Max & Louie have tended to more operatic sounds, but here Lennon is able to display an impressive aptitude for old-school jazz and pop standards. She especially excels in the more upbeat songs, like “Miss Otis Regrets” and “I Love Paris”, as well as displaying an impressive range on numbers like “Wunderbar” and “So In Love”. It’s an impressive vocal performance, and acting-wise, Lennon does about as much with the material as I could imagine anyone could. She’s a strong presence on the stage.

Aside from Lennon, the other real “stars” of this show are the technical designers. This is a great looking show, from Dansi Dai’s simple but lavish set that stages the performance on a giant, well-appointed piano. The storytelling is also augmented greatly through the use of Michael Perkins’s excellent projections, that illustrate Linda’s story from the beginning–with photos of the real Linda–to the end. Costume designer Teresa Doggett has outfitted Lennon in some elegant, well-suited ensembles as well. There’s also excellent atmospheric lighting by Patrick Huber and sound by Phillip Evans. Lennon is also backed by an excellent band led by music director Greg Schweitzer.

The story that Lennon, as Linda, tells here is a potentially fascinating one, and there could be a more thorough treatment than this one. Still, as it is, Love, Linda is an entertaining show, especially when it comes to the production values and, especially, the music. It gives its talented star an excellent outlet for displaying her impressive vocal skills, highlights the repertoire of a Broadway legend, and provides a look at the complex, sometimes difficult, sometimes poignant life of the woman who married that legend. It’s great music well-sung, and with style.

 

Debby Lennon
Photo by Dunsi Dai
Max & Louie Productions

 

Max & Louie Productions is presenting Love, Linda at the Marcelle Theatre until January 27, 2019

Read Full Post »