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Frozen
Music and Lyrics by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
Book by Jennifer Lee
Directed by Michael Grandage
Choreographed by Rob Ashford
The Fox Theatre
November 3, 2022

Caroline Bowman, Lauren Nicole Chapman, and cast of Frozen
Photo by Matthew Murphy
Frozen North American Tour

Frozen has become a household name these days, starting with the hit Disney film, which spawned a sequel, and a Broadway musical that’s enjoyed a popular North American tour. The modern classic tale of magic, the love of family (both biological and found), and overcoming fear has now landed at the Fox, in a production that’s technically stunning to the point that I haven’t seen in a touring production, as well as boasting a strong cast and a memorable score. 

If you’ve seen the movie, you’ll know the plot, although there are a few additions and expansions to the story for the stage version. Still, it’s a fairly faithful translation from screen to stage, centering on a pair of royal sisters. Elsa (Caroline Bowman), the heir to the throne of the fictional kingdom of Arendelle, has magical ice-creation powers that she’s hidden since childhood when she (played as a child by Sydney Elise Russell at the performance I saw) accidentally lost control of her power and injured her younger, non-magical sister, Anna (Aria Kane as a child at my performance, Lauren Nicole Chapman as an adult). The princesses’ parents, King Agnarr (Kyle Lamar Mitchell) and Queen Iduna (Belinda Allyn), are concerned, and after summoning the “hidden folk” led by Pabbie (Tyler Jimenez) to heal Anna and remove her memories of Elsa’s magic, they swear Elsa to secrecy and encourage her to hide her power. Upon their parents’ unexpected death in a shipwreck, the princesses live a reclusive life in the palace until the day arrives for Elsa’s coronation as Queen. The fearful Elsa, who has shunned her sister to protect her, welcomes the public to the palace for the first time in years, which leads to a series of events that changes everyone’s lives and threatens the survival of the kingdom. Along the way, Elsa has to learn what to do with her great power, and she and Anna learn about the power of love–familial for the sisters, but also of the romantic variety for Anna, as she falls quickly for the newly arrived Prince Hans (Will Savarese), while later finding herself drawn to mountain-dwelling ice-seller Kristoff (Dominic Dorset), who helps her look for Elsa after a catastrophic mishap sends the Queen fleeing to the mountains. 

This is a fairly well-structured show, although perhaps a little too much time is given to the prologue, and the finale seems a little bit rushed. Still, it’s a thrilling adventure for the most part, and sure to please fans of the movie. All the well-known characters are here, from the sisters to the mysterious Prince Hans, to the brave and loyal Kristoff and his reindeer friend, Sven (Collin Baja at the performance I saw, aided by a magnificent costume/puppet), and the lovable snowman Olaf (Jeremy Davis, operating a well-realized puppet). The music is familiar as well, with favorites like “Do You Want to Build a Snowman?” and the iconic “Let It Go” joined by a few new songs for the stage. 

The cast is excellent across the board, with memorable performances and an excellent sisterly bond from Bowman as the conflicted, secretive Elsa and Chapman as the energetic, adventurous Anna. While Elsa is prominent in the show, and Bowman shines in her scenes, showing off her powerful vocals on “Let It Go”, in the stage version especially, this comes across more as Anna’s story primarily, and Chapman does a commendable job holding the audience’s attention with her excellent vocals, comic timing, dramatic ability, and dance skills. The young Russell and Kane are also strong as the sisters in the prologue scenes. There are also standout performances from the engaging Dorset as Kristoff, whose scenes with Chapman are a highlight; and Savarese, whose Hans is suitably charming upon his introduction. Davis as Olaf is also a delight, providing comic relief as well as some heartwarming moments without ever going over-the-top. The puppetry, designed by Michael Curry, is stunning here, as well, also lending realism and wonder to the role of Sven, who is acted beautifully by Baja in a fully articulated reindeer outfit. Michael Milkanen also has a notable moment here as shopkeeper Oaken, who leads the bright and hilarious Act 2 opening number “Hygge”. There’s great work from all the players here, and striking, energetic choreography by Rob Ashford that helps move the story along well. 

As good as the cast is, however, the biggest star in this production is the technical wizardry that provides many “ooh” and “ahh” moments in the show. The glorious set and costumes by Christopher Oram and the special effects by Jeremy Chernick are probably the most elaborate and impressive that I have seen in a touring production of any show. Along with the dazzling lighting by Natasha Katz and video design by Finn Ross, these technical elements truly draw the audience into the world of Arendelle, first in the richly appointed castle and then into the awe-inspiring, wintery mountain landscape. It’s a magnificent technical achievement that serves the story well and inspired applause in at least one notable moment later in the show.

Frozen is certainly a crowd-pleaser. It’s also a heartfelt, occasionally thrilling story with a clear message about overcoming fear and the importance of love–not just romantic, but also (and especially) love of family. It’s appealing for all ages, as well.  It’s been a while since I had seen the movie, but the stage version strikes me as an especially fine, successful adaptation. 

Dominic Dorset, Colln Baja
Photo by Matthew Murphy
Frozen North American Tour

The North American Tour of Frozen is running at the Fox Theatre until November 13, 2022

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