Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘insight theatre company’

The Revolutionists
by Lauren Gunderson
Directed by Trish Brown
Insight Theatre Company
June 29, 2019

Jenni Ryan, Kimmie Kidd, Laurie McConnell
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theatre is continuing its latest season with a play by one of today’s most recognized playwrights. Lauren Gunderson’s plays have been performed by many theatre companies around the country, and in St. Louis lately, including Insight who last year was one of two local professional companies who presented Gunderson’s Silent Sky. This time, the featured show is The Revolutionists, a four-woman play that presents itself as a comedy, but has some striking dramatic twists.

The play, like other Gunderson plays I’ve seen, has a structure in which character interactions are crucial. There’s a plot, revolving around the French Revolution and specifically the Reign of Terror, and some prominent figures from that time, along with a fictional character who is something of a composite. The central figure is early feminist playwright Olympe de Gouges (Jenni Ryan), who as the play begins is struggling with how to continue her latest work-in-progress. As she struggles with style, story, dramatic form, and the purpose of her play, she comes into contact with other women who challenge her perspective. These women include determined assassin Charlotte Corday (Samantha Auch) and conflicted former Queen Marie Antoinette (Laurie McConnell), as well as Haitian activist Marianne Angelle, who is fighting to end slavery in her home country, which was then under French rule. The women share their stories and struggles with one another, encouraging Olympe to own up to her own convictions and not give into fear. Although the setting is specific, the situations and structure make the conflict more universal. It’s about France, but it also isn’t. Essentially, it’s about standing up for what one believes in, and about women making their voices heard. The interplay between the characters and witty, pointedly contemporary dialogue serve to make this show both compelling and relatable, with well-drawn characters and some fun “meta” moments thrown in along with some poignancy and an increasingly dramatic tone as the story plays out.

It’s a play essentially about the French Revolution, but it’s also “out of time” in important ways, such as language and the way in which the characters relate to one another, which is decidedly modern. It also has aspects that remind me of another Gunderson play, I and You, in some key ways that will become apparent to those who have seen both plays (although these stories are very different in other ways). The presentation of the show is unconventional, in a way, in that it’s especially minimalist, with a set by Leah McFall that consists entirely of a few period-specific furniture pieces that are used to set the tone and mood, but with the simplicity of the space highlighting the experimental tone of the play. It’s presented in the round, as well, which works especially well for the small-ish space at the Marcelle. Also of note are the costumes by Julian King, which are richly detailed and which help to emphasize the differences in situation between the characters. There’s also excellent use of lighting by Morgan Brennan that adds drama in some key scenes, and sound by Bob Schmit that provides essential context for the piece.

Even with its excellent technical aspects, the biggest asset of this production is its superb cast, led by Ryan in an impressively relatable turn as the show’s main viewpoint character, Olympe. In the midst of conflict and challenge, Ryan makes Olympe’s concerns and fears credible. She also shows strong chemistry with her castmates, who also give memorable performances. McConnell, as probably the best known character in the play, is especially strong, bringing a sense of real depth to a character who is portrayed as more complex than popular history has often painted her. It’s a winning portrayal. Kidd, as the idealistic Marianne, is also a strong presence, as is Auch in an intense portrayal as the single-minded Charlotte. It’s a impressive cast all-around, with excellent energy and rapport.

This is a play I didn’t know much about before seeing it, except for knowing a little about the history and having seen some of the playwright’s other plays. Overall, I think The Revolutionists holds up with Gunderson’s best work. It may not be the most detailed in terms of history, but I don’t think it’s trying to be. It’s more about the characters and the points they are making, which revolve around women maintaining the courage of their convictions. At Insight, it’s a dynamically staged, impeccably cast production that’s sure to provoke some compelling conversations. It’s definitely one to check out.

Jenni Ryan, Samantha Auch, Kimmie Kidd
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theater Company is presenting The Revolutionists at the Marcelle Theatre until July 14, 2019

Read Full Post »

Daddy Long Legs
Music and Lyrics by Paul Gordon, Book by John Caird
Based on the Novel by Jean Webster
Directed by Maggie Ryan

March 29, 2019

 

Terry Barber, Jennifer Theby-Quinn
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theatre Company’s latest production is something of a surprise, at least to me. I wasn’t very familiar with the source material before seeing this show, and the premise seemed somewhat problematic (even creepy) to my 21st Century eyes at first glance. Still, John Caird and Paul Goron’s musical version of Daddy Long Legs has been critically acclaimed in its London, New York, and regional runs, and the casting looked good. Now, upon seeing it, I’m pleased to report that not only is the production a sheer delight–it’s in the best musical production I’ve ever seen from this company.

Looking at the plot of this show through a 21st Century lense, the plot seems at least a little suspect. A young and rich, but socially awkward benefactor chooses an orphan girl to support and send to college, and (spoiler!) it eventually evolves into a love story. There are so many potential problems with this setup just looking at it like that, but one of the most admirable things about this show is that it doesn’t ignore or gloss over the potential problems–it directly addresses them and has the characters challenge and confront them, from power imbalances to dishonesty and misrepresentation and more. Ultimately, though, it’s a story of a surprising relationship that grows from entirely different intentions. It also helps that the orphaned Jerusha Abbott (Jennifer Theby-Quinn) is already 18 when the story begins. As she explains in song, she’s “The Oldest Orphan” at the place where she grew up, the John Grier Home, feeling as if she is stuck there by her circumstances and by societal expectations. Jesper Pendleton (Terry Barber) is a man from a prestigious family who has come into wealth at young age, and is a trustee for the orphanage. He’s financed other orphans’ college educations before as an act of charity, but only with boys until Jerusha, who has impressed him with an essay she has written. Initially, it’s all anonymous and mysterious, with Jerusha expected to write letters to the pseudonymous “Mr. John Smith” with no expectation of receiving a reply. She nicknames her benefactor “Daddy Long Legs” based on catching a glimpse of his tall figure walking away, and imagines him as an old man. As her letters grow more descriptive and animated, reflecting her strong and determined personality, Jesper is increasingly impressed, to the point where he feels compelled to meet her in person, and the story–and the relationship–grow more complex, and complicated, from there. I won’t give away too much, because that would spoil the fun of this surprising, richly characterized, and musically memorable character study that’s at times funny, thought-provoking, emotionally intense, thoughtful, and heartwarming. It’s well structured, and there’s never a dull moment.

The is a two-character show, and both performers are ideally cast in their roles. Jerusha carries most of the weight of the show. She appears to be the focus character for much of the story, and Theby-Quinn is truly impressive in the role, showing off her great acting range from delightfully snarky comic moments to poignant drama, as well as excellent vocals. Barber, as the initially more mysterious Jervis, does an excellent job of showing the character’s emotional growth, starting out as rather stuffy and remote, to displaying a real depth and vulnerability that reveals itself gradually as the story unfolds. He also has a glorious voice, particularly on his character’s personal epiphany moment with the song “Charity” in the second act. The chemistry between the performers is delightful, as well, also starting out believably awkward but then growing as the characters interact more. It’s a believable progression, and their voices blend together impressively, as well.

The staging is impressive, as well, with a meticulously detailed period set and striking lighting by Rob Lippert, and marvelously detailed costumes by Julian King. Jerusha’s outfits are particularly impressive, as she goes through various costume changes onstage for a variety of authentic early 1900’s looks. The only minor distraction is Barber’s somewhat obvious wig, but all other aspects of this production are stunning. There’s also excellent work from the small band led by music director Scott Schoonover.

This is a real must-see of a show. It’s a touching, tuneful, and impeccably staged production with two top-notch leading performances and a vividly realized portrayal of its time and place. It’s not only the best musical I’ve seen from Insight. It’s up there with 2014’s stunning Death of Salesman as one of their two best overall shows I’ve been able to attend there. Daddy Long Legs is truly marvelous production.

Terry Barber, Jennifer Theby-Quinn
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theatre Company is presenting Daddy Long Legs at the Marcelle Theatre until April 14, 2019

 

Read Full Post »

Silent Sky
by Lauren Gunderson
Directed by Maggie Ryan
Insight Theatre Company
October 19, 2018

silentskyinsight2

Jennifer Theby-Quinn, Elizabeth Townsend, Gwendolyn Wotawa, Chrissy Steele Photo by John Lamb Insight Theatre Company

 

Lauren Gunderson’s Silent Sky is a popular play, apparently. It has already been performed in St. Louis in an excellent production by another theatre company earlier this year, and it seems to be a favorite of various theatre companies across the country. Now, it’s onstage at the Kranzberg Arts Center in a heartwarming, superbly staged and ideally cast production by Insight Theatre Company.

The show tells the story of pioneering women in the field of astronomy, and particularly of Henrietta Leavitt (Gwendolyn Wotawa), who takes a job as a “computer” recording data at Harvard in the late 1890s and eventually makes a discovery that has far-reaching influence on the field of astronomy. She also gets to know her co-workers, fellow computers Williamina Fleming (Chrissy Steele) and Annie Cannon (Elizabeth Townsend), forming a strong bond over the years as the three do their jobs and struggle for recognition in a male-dominated field. The story also highlights Leavitt’s relationship with her sister Margaret (Jennifer Theby-Quinn), who in many ways is the opposite of Henrietta, even though they have a close bond. While Henrietta dreams of the stars and focuses on her career, the musically gifted Margaret stays home, marries and has children, encouraging Henrietta in her work but still hoping she will come visit her and their minister father more often. Although there is also a subplot involving a romantic attachment to another co-worker, Peter Shaw (Alex Freeman), the play continually makes the point that, for Henrietta, her true love is her work. The close female friendships and bond with her sister are important, as well, but ultimately, she focuses on the stars and wants to leave a legacy for those who follow after her. It’s a strong script, with well-defined characters and relationships, with an overarching theme of persistence in going after one’s goals and defying expectations.

The casting here is especially strong, with the relationship between Henrietta and Margaret a dramatic highlight, as Wotawa and Theby-Quinn give their characters a great deal of credibility. Both give thoughtful, energetic portrayals, with Theby-Quinn’s obvious musical ability on display as she plays and sings hymns and classical style music on the piano. Wotawa’s Leavitt is determined, persistent, and relatable, as well. In addition, Townsend as the tough, iconoclastic Annie and Steele as the encouraging, also determined Williamina are also excellent, as is Freeman as the initially incredulous but increasing supportive Shaw, and his scenes with Wotawa are especially strong. With such a small cast, ensemble chemistry is especially important, and this production has that, bringing the characters to life in relatable, believable relationships and motivations.

The small black box space at the Kranzberg is impressively transformed into a dynamic field of stars through the excellent set design by Constance Vale. Rob Lippert’s lighting is highly effective as well in helping achieve a starry effect. There’s also impressive work from sound designer James Blanton and costume designer Julian King, who outfits the cast in period-appropriate costumes that are well-suited to the characters’ personalities. The sense of time and place, as well as the passage of time, is well communicated here, as the story covers several decades in the characters’ lives.

As popular as this play is, and as recently as it has been performed in St. Louis, you may be wondering why you would need to see this production if you’ve seen it before. My answer to that question is this–excellence. It’s a well-told tale impressively portrayed, with especially strong performances by a standout cast. Even if you’ve seen this play before, this production is impressive in its own right. It’s a small cast show with a big scope, highlighting an important historical figure who deserves recognition, and boasting a truly wonderful cast. Go see it!

Gwendolyn Wotawa, Alex Freeman Photo by John Lamb Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theatre Company is presenting Silent Sky at the Kranzberg Arts Center until November 4, 2018.

Read Full Post »

The Importance of Being Earnest
by Oscar Wilde
Directed by Ed Reggi
Insight Theatre Company
July 12, 2018

Will Bonfiglio, Julia Crump, Gwen Wotawa, Pete Winfrey
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

The Importance of Being Earnest is a classic play that has been performed and taught in school literature classes for many years. Despite this ubiquity, though, I had never seen the play live before–I had only seen filmed versions. Now, Insight Theatre Company has given me and theatregoers in St. Louis the opportunity to see this legendary example of writer Oscar Wilde’s wit and characterization. It’s a great script, and Insight has brought it to the stage at the Grandel Theatre with an excellent cast and well-paced staging.

This is a prime example of an English “Drawing Room Comedy”, and a particularly madcap one at that, with loads of witty banter and plot twists involving mistaken identity, long-held family secrets, romantic complications, and more, all taking place in the world of upper-class Victorian English society. The story centers on two young friends, bachelors Algernon “Algie” Moncrieff (Will Bonfiglio) and John “Jack” Worthing (Pete Winfey), and on the significance of the name “Ernest”, which is how Jack has been identifying himself to Algie until circumstances force him to admit that he’s been posing as his own imaginary younger brother as an excuse for his many pleasure-seeking jaunts to London from his country estate. When Jack tells Algie about his life at the “Manor House”, and especially of his young ward Cecily Cardew (Julia Crump), Algie gets an idea that eventually stirs up even more trouble that eventually involves everyone closest to both men, including Cecily’s governess Miss Prism (Ruth Ezell), clergyman Dr Chasuble (Steve Springmeyer), and the object of Jack’s affection, Algie’s cousin Gwendolyn Fairfax (Gwen Wotawa), who is the daughter of the well-connected Lady Bracknell (Tom Murray). The situations all resolve in a hilarious way, relying largely on sharp satirical comedy and Wilde’s sharp, witty dialogue.

This is a funny play to read, but it’s even funnier on stage, brought to life in vibrant, face-paced style by director Ed Reggi and a wonderful, ideal cast. Bonfiglio, as the mischievous Algie, and Winfrey, as the somewhat bewildered Jack are the core of this production. Their banter is a highlight of the show. There are also delightful performances from Wotawa and Crump as the sometimes friendly, sometimes combative Gwendolyn and Cecily. Both performers have excellent chemistry with their respective love interests, as well, and Wotawa especially pronounces Wilde’s clever dialogue with a sense of polished delight. Murray is also a treasure as the imperious Lady Bracknell. Ezell as the secretive, protective Miss Prism and Springmeyer as the loyal Dr Chasuble are also strong, as is Spencer Kruse in a dual role as two different butlers. The cast here is cohesive and energetic, doing justice to Wilde’s script. As clever as the dialgoue is, this is somewhat of a talky play, so it requires excellent timing and presence–and this cast delivers that with verve and deliciously droll style.

The Victorian atmosphere of the production is well-maintained here, with excellent costumes by Laura Hanson and a well-appointed set by Sucas Shryock. Tony Anselmo’s lighting and James Blanton’s sound design also lend to the overall whimsical mood of the show. Kudos also to dialect consultant Jeff Cummings and the entire cast for the constistent, appropriately posh English accents.

This is a show that’s been performed countless times throughout the world for over 100 years, and it still holds up in terms of story, comedy, and the oh-so-witty dialogue. The Importance of Being Earnest is a classic for good reason, and Insight’s production certainly does it justice. It fits well in the newly restored Grandel Theatre. There’s stil time to catch it. I highly recommend it!

Cast of The Importance of Being Earnest
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theatre Company is presenting The Importance of Being Earnest at the Grandel Theatre until July 22, 2018.

Read Full Post »

The Last Romance
by Joe DiPietro
Directed by Alan Knoll
Insight Theatre Company
March 3, 2018

Tommy Nolan, Joneal Joplin
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Now onstange at the Kranzberg black box, Insight Theatre Company’s latest production is Joe DiPietro’s romantic comedy-drama The Last Romance. A look at love, life, loss, and opera, the show boasts a top-notch cast of veteran St. Louis performers. It’s a small-ish play, with a close focus on well-drawn characters and a somewhat melancholy air.

The story follows 80-year-old Ralph Bellini (Joneal Joplin), a widower and lifelong opera lover in New York City who once had an audition with the Met. He lives with his sister Rose (Maggie Ryan) in a small apartment and has a relatively routine, predictable life until one day when he spots Carol (Tommy Nolan) at a local dog park and makes an effort to get to know her.  Carol, for her part, is initially reluctant to engage with Ralph, and she’s got a few secrets she’s not eager to share. Rose, in the meantime, has her own issues that make her a little more protective of Ralph than may be expected. Ralph is also accompanied by memories of his past, represented by The Young Man (Clark Sturdevant), who appears in flashbacks and fantasy moments singing a selection of classic operatic arias, usually as a reprentation of the younger Ralph. It’s a simple, character-focused story with humor, music, and a good amount of reflective drama, played well by the excellent cast.

Joneal Joplin is, as usual, excellent as Ralph. With his prolific theatrical career, Joplin can be expected to turn in a strong performance, and he does so here as the persistent, personable, somewhat regretful Ralph. His chemistry is strong with Nolan’s evasive and also compelling Carol, as well as the equally strong Ryan in a poignant performance as the overprotective Rose. Sturdevant is in excellent voice and has a strong presence as the Young Man, as well. The real heart of this play is in its relationships, and all of the cast members work together well to present a touching, believable emotional journey. There’s also a memorable appearance from Yorkshire terrier Oscar as Carol’s dog, Peaches.

The atmosphere here is at once realistic and fantastical. The set by Landon Shaw represents the New York park setting well, as well as Ralph and Rose’s small apartment and a few other locations as needed. There’s also an ethereal air lent by Geordy Van Es’s lighting and Robin Weatherall’s sound design that adds to the flashback sequences and musical interludes. Teresa Doggett’s costume design is appropriately on point, as well, and director Alan Knoll’s staging is intimate and personal, effectively showcasing the insightful script and excellent cast.

The Last Romance isn’t a big, flashy play, and the situations presented aren’t flashy or spectacular either. These are more of the authentic, “every day” moments of a long life full of regret as well as joy. The alternately melancholy and hopeful air is well-portrayed in the music, as well. There’s a great cast here, of great local performers, telling a story with a lot about which to relate, no matter your age, and even though it’s not a musical, music a vital part of this story. It’s well worth seeing, and hearing.

Maggie Ryan, Joneal Joplin
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theatre Company is presenting The Last Romance at the Kranzberg Arts Center until March 18, 2018.

Read Full Post »

Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery
by Ken Ludwig
Directed by Maggie Ryan
October 14, 2017

John O’Hagan, Gwen Wotawa, Elliot Auch, Kent Coffel
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theatre Company is closing out their latest season with a comic mystery that’s familiar in more ways than one.  Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery is another telling of a well-known story about a well-known literary detective, but its style is also somewhat familiar, calling to mind another popular theatrical comedy thriller. At Insight, this story benefits from an impressive cast and some clever staging.

The first thing that came to my mind when reading about the structure of this show wasn’t Sherlock Holmes but another popular mystery story that’s been given the comic theatrical treatment, The 39 Steps. Like that popular and often-staged play, Baskerville is staged with a small cast, and with some of the cast members playing a wide variety of characters. It also has some similar staging conventions and pacing. Still, it stands well on its own without appearing merely derivative. The story is based on one of Arthur Conan Doyle’s more well known Holmes tales, The Hound of the Baskervilles. The characters of Holmes (John O’Hagan) and Dr. Watson (Kent Coffel) are central, especially Watson in this staging. All the other characters are played by three performers, billed as Actor 1 (Elliot Auch), Actor 2 (Ed Reggi), and Actress 1 (Gwen Wotawa). The story follows Holmes and Watson as they investigate a strange case involving a murder on a moor bordering a country estate and an old family legend of a gigantic killer hound. The estate’s heir is transplanted Texan Sir Henry Baskerville (Reggi), who gets a note warning him to stay away from the moor. Watson then goes with him to his newly inherited estate to try to figure out what’s going on. Much intrigue, scheming, and hilarity follows, as the various characters and would-be suspects are introduced, and as the plot is further complicated by an unexpected romantic entanglement.

Although this is billed as a Sherlock Holmes story, it’s actually Watson who seems to get the most stage time, and Coffel plays his role with charm and energy. O’Hagan is also excellent as the brilliant but evasive Holmes. The other three players, each playing a number of roles, are excellent as well, with Auch displaying a variety of accents in various roles ranging from Baskerville neighbor Dr. Mortimer, to mysterious and butterfly-obsessed Jack Stapleton to a young informant helping Holmes. Reggi plays the friendly but bewildered Baskerville and a number of other roles, including the gruff Inspector Lestrade, among others. There’s some particularly clever staging involving an extremely quick character change by Reggi that provokes a big laugh from the audience. Wotawa rounds out the cast in a variety of roles ranging from various women involved in the case–particularly Beryl, who becomes involved with Sir Henry–as well as a young boy who helps Holmes gather information in London. The staging involves a lot of quick costume changes, as well as some self-referential humor, and it’s all performed with a lot of enthusiasm by this energetic ensemble.

The set, designed by Matt Stuckel, is versatile and works well for the quickly moving nature of this play. With movable set pieces and a prominent video screen, the locations can be set easily and moved around with speed. There’s also excellent atmospheric lighting by Connor Meers and strong sound design by Robin Weatherall, providing the various affects needed for the situations, from comic to spooky. All the technical elements work together well to help tell this story and facilitate the high-energy, always moving style of the show, as well as the traditional “Sherlock Holmes” look.

Baskerville is a lot of fun.  It’s a well-timed and cleverly staged production that provides a lot of opportunities for versatility among the cast members. It’s Sherlock Holmes, but not like you may expect. It’s a memorable way for Insight to close a successful season.

Ed Reggi, Kent Coffel, Elliot Auch
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theatre Company is presenting Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery at the .Zack Theatre until October 29, 2017

 

 

Read Full Post »

On Golden Pond
by Ernest Thompson
Directed by Trish Brown
Insight Theatre Company
July 7, 2017

Susie Wall, Joneal Joplin
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

On Golden Pond is a play that’s perhaps best known by its film adaptation, starring movie legends Henry Fonda and Katharine Hepburn. The play itself has been seen as a showcase for distinguished peformers, and Insight’s latest production is a prime example, featuring a cast of excellent and award-winning local performers, and particularly in its two lead roles, played by the talented and prolific Joneal Joplin and Susie Wall.

This is a play that’s more character-driven than story-driven. The story is fairly slight, in fact. It’s a look at a long-married couple spending the summer at their lake house in Maine, like they have for the previous 47 years. Norman Thayer, Jr. (Joplin) is a retired university English professor, and he’s become increasingly curmudgeonly as he approaches his 80th birthday. His more optimistic wife, Ethel (Wall), grows weary of Norman’s constant talk about death and his strained relationship with their middle-aged daughter, Chelsea (Jenni Ryan), who has come to visit for Norman’s birthday with her new boyfriend, dentist Bill (Eric Dean White) and his 15-year-old son Billy (Michael Pierce) in tow. The “story” here is about the relationships, and how Norman and Ethel come to terms with aging and with the reality of the idea that each new summer at Golden Pond may be their last. It explores themes of aging, regret, broken and reconciling relationships, inter-generational friendships, and more while providing an excellent showcase for the actors involved.

And “the actors involved” are remarkable. Joplin, one of St. Louis theatre’s most prolific actors for the past few decades, has an ideal role here with Norman. Despite the more unsavory aspects of the character–his negativity and particularly his casual bigotry–Joplin’s considerable skill as an actor brings out the sympathy in Norman’s situation, and particularly in his relationships with Ethel, Chelsea, and Billy. Wall matches Joplin in every way as well in a formidable portrayal of the insistently, persistently optimistic Ethel, and their chemistry is heartwarmingly credible. There are also strong performances from the supporting cast–Ryan as the wounded but hopeful Chelsea, Pierce as the initially moody Billy–who bonds with Norman over fishing–White in the small role of the loyal new boyfriend Bill, and also from Kurt Knoedelseder as the sweet, slightly goofy local mailman Charlie, who grew up in the area and knows the family well.

The setting is well-realized, with Matt Stuckel’s detailed set bringing the rustic summer home to life with meticulous authenticity. The digital screen serving as the picture window overlooking the lake provides a nice atmospheric touch, and Robin Weatherall’s sound design contributes to the overall effect as well, as does Geordy Van Es’s lighting. My only small quibble is that the script, written in the late 1970s, doesn’t always lend well to the updating of the setting to the present day, as this production has done. Some of the dialogue and situations make more sense with the earlier setting.

There’s drama and a good amount of humor in On Golden Pond, with its somewhat talky story and with those richly portrayed characters, with the lake house itself becoming a prominent character as well. There isn’t a lot in terms of action, but at its best, it’s a moving look at aging, youth, family, and the power of memory and hope. The heart of the show, however, is the relationship between Norman and Ethel, which is touchingly portrayed here by two superb veteran St. Louis performers.

Jenni Ryan, Susie Wall
Photo by John Lamb
Insight Theatre Company

Insight Theatre Company is presenting On Golden Pond at the .Zack Theatre until July 23, 2017.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »