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Posts Tagged ‘John Pierson’

The Feast
by Cory Finley
Directed by John Pierson
St. Louis Actors’ Studio
September 22, 2017

Spencer Sickmann
Photo by Patrick Huber
St. Louis Actors’ Studio

St. Louis Actors’ Studio is highlighting local talent in the first play of its new season, The Feast. Written by a St. Louis native and featuring three talented local performers, The Feast is something of a comedy thriller, but with the “thriller” elements becoming more and more apparent as the story plays out. It’s a memorable, even chilling production.

This is the story of a man and his toilet, essentially. Matt (Spencer Sickmann) is a painter who lives in a small apartment with his girlfriend Anna (Jennifer Theby-Quinn). He’s woken up one morning by a visit from a plumber (Ryan Foizey, who plays several roles), who informs Matt that Anna has called because their toilet has been making unusual noises. Matt himself seems both disturbed and increasingly fascinated by the strange sounds. As Matt tries to go about his everyday life, his thoughts keep getting drawn to that toilet, and the strange noises and sights that go on in his bathroom. The “toilet problem” grows as Matt talks to his therapist and his agent (both played by Foizey), and as he navigates difficulties in his relationship with the evasive Anna.  Something of a mythology emerges through the course of the play about what’s actually happening. We know Matt believes there’s something real behind these strange phenomena, and something of an odd mythology emerges, although we aren’t sure if the strange occurrences are real or if they are all in Matt’s head. The script is clever, with a balance of comedy and horror elements. The comedy is inherent in some of the relationship dynamics and in the basic premise of a toilet that “speaks”. Still, the tone gets increasingly unsettling as the story goes on, and the playwright keeps the element of mystery right up until the jarring conclusion.

The production values here help the story along a lot. Patrick Huber’s set is a detailed representation of Matt and Anna’s apartment with a place of prominence given to the bathroom, and the all-important toilet. Huber’s lighting also contributes a great deal to the mood of the piece, especially as the creepiness factor amps up, and the toilet glows. There’s also superb sound design by director John Pierson, lending those otherworldly noises emanating from the throne. There’s also excellent work from costume and props designer Carla Landis Evans.

The acting here is top-notch as well, focusing especially on Sickmann’s impressive performance as Matt. Sickmann is adept at portraying Matt’s many facets, as the frustrated artist, confused and insecure boyfriend, and increasingly fascinated and bewildered witness to the strange goings-on in his toilet and sewer system. The question of Matt’s grasp on reality is clearly apparent in Sickmann’s performance, as is his relatable “everyman” quality even as the weirdness continues to get weirder. There are also strong performances from Theby-Quinn as the professionally ambitious but personally evasive Anna, and by Foizey, billed as “The Man”, playing a variety of characters who may or may not be versions of the same person.

This isn’t a long play, but it’s not the easiest play to describe. It runs slightly more than an hour, but there’s a lot going on in that short period of time. It can be seen as metaphorical in a lot of ways, and there are issues here beyond the simple premise–of honesty in relationships, artistic motivation and integrity, and more. With richly drawn and impeccably cast characters and some simply fantastic technical elements, The Feast is one of those shows that might keep you thinking–and questioning–for a long time after it’s over.

Spencer Sickmann, Jennifer Theby-Quinn
Photo by Patrick Huber
St. Louis Actors’ Studio

St. Louis Actors’ Studio is presenting The Feast at the Gaslight Theatre until October 8, 2017.

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LaBute New Theater Festival 2016
St. Louis Actors’ Studio
July 22, 2016

St. Louis Actors’ Studio’s LaBute festival has become one of the highlights of the summer theatre season in St. Louis after just a few years. Every year, the festival features a new play by celebrated playwright Neil LaBute as well as a variety of new one-act plays by various playwrights. This year, I was unfortunately unable to see the first installment of the festival, although I was able to see the second. In this edition’s selection of plays, the theme of power and control seems to be prevalent. Here are the selections and my thoughts:

“Life Model”

by Neil LaBute

Directed by John Pierson

Bridgette Bassa, Jenny Smith Photo by Patrick Huber St. Louis Actors' Studio

Bridgette Bassa, Jenny Smith
Photo by Patrick Huber
St. Louis Actors’ Studio

This year’s entry from festival namesake LaBute is an exploration of the relationship between artists and the models who pose for them, as well as an exploration of the nature of art itself. The artist (Jenny Smith) has been drawing this particular model (Bridgette Bassa) for a number of weeks or months, although the artist is secretive about her work. When the model challenges the artist’s motives, a power struggle ensues that leads to a somewhat predictable conclusion. This is a well-staged play and the cast members do an excellent job, from Smith’s defensive, evasive artist to Bassa’s confrontational model. Still, the play itself is a little confusing as to what message it’s trying to convey.

“American Outlaws”

by Adam Seidel

Directed by John Pierson

Eric Dean White, David Wassilak Photo by John Lamb St. Louis Actors' Studio

Eric Dean White, David Wassilak
Photo by John Lamb
St. Louis Actors’ Studio

The next play in this installment explores the relationship between two men who have something undisclosed in common. The revelations of this play are too complex to explain without spoiling much, but I’ll just say things aren’t necessarily as they seem, although the conclusion is fairly easy to guess. Eric Dean White is the nervous, conflicted man who has called the meeting, and David Wassilak is the more assured party in the arrangement. It’s clear from start to finish that, although White’s Mitch thinks he has some say in what goes on, it’s Wassilak’s Mike who is in control. The dialogue here is sharply written, and the secrets are revealed in a suspenseful way. Both actors give terrific performances, as well. This is the strongest play of the collection, I think, although it’s extremely bleak.

“Show of Affection”

by Laurence Klavan

Directed by Patrick Huber

Bridgette Bassa, Ryan Foizey Photo by John Lamb St. Louis Actors' Studio

Bridgette Bassa, Ryan Foizey
Photo by John Lamb
St. Louis Actors’ Studio

Here, the festival veers into the realm of horror/fantasy/dark comedy, with a story about a family getting ready for dinner. At first, they seem like a fairly ordinary family, but soon we learn more, as vampires, murder, jealousy, and revenge are brought to bear on the plot. The performances are strong, with Emily Baker’s determined matriarch and David Wassilak’s loyal father anchoring a story that also features memorable performances from Bridgette Bassa and Ryan Foizey in energetic performances as their adult children.  This is an unusual, fast-moving play that features a lot of caustic humor and stylized horror elements. It’s also somewhat predictable, but entertainingly so.

“Blue Balls”

by Willie Johnson

Directed by Patrick Huber

Ryan Foizey, Eric Dean White Photo by John Lamb St. Louis Actors' Studio

Ryan Foizey, Eric Dean White
Photo by John Lamb
St. Louis Actors’ Studio

The final play of the evening has an unfinished quality to it. Ostensibly, it’s about a nervous man, Peter (Eric Dean White) waiting for a woman to get ready for their first date, only to be intimidated by her adult son, Benoit (Ryan Foizey). And that’s it, really. Benoit tries various ways to make Peter uncomfortable, and Peter tries to keep the situation civil, but essentially this is just a son being snarky to his mother’s date. The fact that Benoit has cerebral palsy is made an issue, but it’s ultimately a fairly minor element of the plot. Both actors give good performances, but there really isn’t much to this story beyond that simple conflict.  It also ends rather abruptly with no apparent resolution. Although this has the potential to be an interesting character study, it’s really just a simple situation without much of a story.

Overall, I think the LaBute Festival is an excellent showcase for local talent and new playwrights, and I wish I had been able to see all of the plays this year. The production values are all excellent as well, from Patrick Huber’s versatile set and lighting design to Carla Landis Evans’s costumes and props. It’s another good year for this festival, and I look forward to seeing what STLAS has in store next summer.

The LaBute New Theatre Festival, presented by St. Louis Actors’ Studio, runs at the Gaslight Theatre until July 31, 2016.

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