Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘lorin latarro’

Guys and Dolls
Music and Lyrics by Frank Loesser, Book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows
Directed by Gordon Greenberg
Choreographed by Lorin Lotarro and Patrick O’Neill
The Muny
June 10, 2019

Cast of Guys and Dolls
Photo:The Muny

The stage looks bigger. That was my first impression when the Muny’s Executive Producer and Artistic Director, Mike Isaacson, appeared on the newly rebuilt stage to introduce this season’s opening production, Guys and Dolls. It’s a new era for the Muny, unveiling its newly revamped performance area and technical setup, and they’ve chosen a classic 1950s-set Broadway musical to introduce the “new Muny” to the audience. I’m not sure if the stage really is any bigger, but it looks big, shiny, and new, but what’s not new is the expectation of an excellent show, and the Muny has delivered that with an energetic, fast-paced and thoroughly entertaining production of this well-known “musical fable”.

Guys and Dolls is a show of its time, and that time is the early 1950s. The place is Damon Runyon’s stylized New York City. It’s not supposed to be gritty and realistic. It’s broad comedy, for the most part, and the sensibilities can be jarring to 21st century eyes. The focus is on gamblers and the women who probably shouldn’t love them, but do anyway. Nathan Detroit (Jordan Gelber) is the proprietor of a notorious “floating crap game” who, along with his cohorts Benny Southstreet (Jared Gertner) and Nicely-Nicely Johnson (Orville Mendoza) is eager to find a new place to host the game while they avoid the watchful eye of the persistent police Lt.Brannigan (Rich Pisarkiewicz). He’s also been engaged for 14 years to the increasingly exasperated nightclub dancer Miss Adelaide (Kendra Kassebaum), who is nursing a frequent cold apparently brought on by her stress over the situation. Meanwhile, high rolling gambler Sky Masterson (Ben Davis) is in town, and in order to secure the money he needs for his crap game location, Nathan makes a bet with Sky, involving the pious young Sarah Brown (Brittany Bradford), who works for the struggling Save-a-Soul Mission. It’s a show full of larger-than-life and deliberately broad characterizations, with stereotypical gamblers and visions of New York City, along with a great score and lots of energetic dancing.

One notable fact, casting-wise, about Guys and Dolls is that there are four equal leading roles. It’s not a lead couple and a supporting couple. All four roles–Adelaide, Nathan, Sarah, and Sky–share the same prominence, and the casting for all four is essential. The roles here are memorably played, and the chemistry (“yeah… chemistry!”) is excellent. Davis and Bradford show off strong voices in their roles, and Bradford shows strong comic ability with her fun rendition of “If I Were a Bell”. Gelber is fun as a the marriage-avoidant and crap-game obsessed Nathan, and Kassebaum conveys Adelaide’s increasing weariness along with her genuine love of–and exasperation with–Nathan with impressive presence and energy, delivering a strong rendition of “Adelaide’s Lament” especially. The supporting players are well-cast, as well, led by Mendoza and Gertner who make a fun comic team, and by beloved Muny regular Ken Page in a charming turn as Sarah’s kind, devoted grandfather and co-worker at the mission, Arvide Abernathy. There’s a vibrant, energetic ensemble as well, contributing to dazzling group numbers like “Sit Down You’re Rockin’ the Boat” and “The Crapshooter’s Dance”, which also showcase the dynamic choreography of Lorin Latarro and Patrick O’Neill.

Technically, this production is wondrous, making the most of the new capabilities of the new and improved Muny stage. Paul Tate dePoo III’s stylish, colorful set shows off the neon boldness of old-school New York, aided by the excellent video design by Nathan W. Scheuer and lit up brightly by lighting designer Rob Denton. There are excellent, vividly styled period costumes by Tristan Raines, as well. There’s also a great Muny Orchestra and music direction by Brad Haak that bring Frank Loesser’s classic score to life with verve.

Guys and Dolls is a fun show. It’s big, bold, and full of energy, filling the Muny’s enormous stage with stylized characterizations and energetic singing and dancing. I’m not sure if the new stage really is bigger, but it seems that way, and it certainly looks newer, with some new aspects that add to its versatility. It’s a new stage for a new era, and Guys and Dolls is ushering that new era, and the Muny’s 101st season, with style.

Cast of Guys and Dolls
Photo: The Muny

The Muny is presenting Guys and Dolls in Forest Park until June 16, 2019

Read Full Post »

Waitress
Book by Jessie Nelson, Music and Lyrics by Sara Bareilles
Based on the Motion Picture Written by Adrienne Shelly
Directed by Diane Paulus
Choreographed by Lorin Latarro
The Fox Theatre
March 26, 2019

Christine Dwyer
Photo by Philicia Endelman
Waitress North American Tour

Waitress is the hit Broadway musical based on a cult-hit movie, and featuring lots and lots of pies. It’s one of those shows that might have you craving baked goods by the time the curtain goes down. It did for me, anyway. Still, there’s a lot more than pastries to commend this show, and this touring production currently on stage at the Fox. What’s front and center, beside the pies, is the excellent score and a top-notch leading performance, along with a strong supporting cast, even though the story itself has its problems.

With a catchy score by singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles, Waitress benefits from the name recognition of both Bareilles and the movie on which the show is based. I hadn’t seen the movie or the show before, so this touring production is my introduction, beyond knowing the basic plot and hearing one of the songs (the poignant “She Used to Be Mine”). The story follows Jenna (Christine Dwyer), who–as the title suggests–is a waitress at a small-town eatery called Joe’s Pie Diner. She’s more than a waitress, though, as she personally bakes the pies the establishment sells, as well as inventing the recipes. She works alongside fellow waitresses Becky (Maiesha McQueen) and Dawn (Ephie Aardema), supervised by the gruff cook Cal (Ryan G. Dunkin). She also waits on the diner’s eccentric owner, Joe (Richard Kline) every day, and goes home every night to her volatile, abusive husband Earl (Matt DeAngelis). The story begins when Jenna finds out she’s pregnant. She’s not thrilled with the news, but she resolves to make the most of it, making an OB/GYN appointment and meeting her new doctor, Dr. Pomatter (Steven Good), with whom she develops an initially awkward flirtation. And… that’s about as far as I can explain the plot without spoiling too much. What I will say, though, is that this show has its issues, not the least of which being problematic aspects of several of the relationships. The show is at its strongest when focusing on Jenna as an individual, and in her friendships with her fellow waitresses and with Joe, and Bareilles’s score is excellent, with several catchy songs that serve the story and the characters well. I just have some trouble liking some of the characters I think the show wants me to like (especially Dr. Pomatter), and some of the characters aren’t as well-drawn as they could be.

The real strength of this production is its central performance, and a few of the supporting performances. Dwyer is simply remarkable as Jenna, with a strong voice and excellent stage presence. She makes Jenna a relatable protagonist, and her pie-baking scenes involving flashbacks to her personal history are a particular highlight, as is her powerhouse performance of the show’s most well-known song, the aforementioned “She Used to Be Mine”. There’s also excellent support from McQueen as the snarky Becky and especially Aardema as the quirky, initially lonely Dawn, along with a standout performance from the energetic Jeremy Morse as Ogie, Dawn’s socially awkward suitor. Kline as the crotchety but secretly supportive Joe is also memorable, as is Dawn Bless as Nurse Norma, the nurse at Dr Pomatter’s practice. DeAngelis is a suitable villain as the obnoxious Earl, and there are also fine performances from Dunkin as Cal and Good as Dr. Pomatter, although I didn’t care about their characters as much as the show seems to want me to. There’s also a strong ensemble, supporting the leads well in the various production numbers.

Technically, this show impresses, with a versatile, eye-catching set by Scott Pask that smoothly transitions from the diner set to other locations as needed, and a stunning backdrop enhanced by Ken Billington’s excellent atmospheric lighting. The costumes by Suttirat Ann Larlarb are also striking, suiting the characters and the tone of the show especially well. Another memorable feature is that the band is onstage throughout the show, and they’re in excellent form, as conducted by music director and keyboardist Robert Cookman.

Waitress is, ultimately, an entertaining show, especially in terms of the score and the truly superb performance of Christine Dwyer as Jenna. Story-wise, it has its problematic elements, although for the most part–especially when it focuses on Jenna herself–it’s compelling. And of course, there’s pie– there were some “pies in a jar” on sale at intermission as a clever tie-in. It’s certainly crowd-pleaser, as well, and a thought-provoking conversation-starter. It’s worth checking out.

Steven Good, Christine Dwyer
Photo by Philicia Endelman
Waitress North American Tour

The North American tour of Waitress is playing at the Fox Theatre until April 7, 2019

Read Full Post »