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Fully Committed
by Becky Mode
Directed by Ellie Schwetye
New Jewish Theatre
December 5, 2019

Will Bonfliglio
Photo by Jon Gitchoff
New Jewish Theatre

One person shows are difficult enough, I would think. Still, when that one person is playing a multitude of characters all in the course of approximately 80 minutes, that seems especially challenging. Will Bonfiglio, as a performer, is no stranger to one person shows, winning critical acclaim, but now he’s taking the challenge to the next level in New Jewish Theatre’s latest production, the quick-paced, multi-character comedy Fully Committed. In fact, that title is an apt description for Bonfliglio’s performance, as he shows off his comic and dramatic abilities with impressive versatility and timing.

Bonfiglio showed his versatility playing multiple characters a few years ago in Stray Dog Theatre’s production of Buyer and Cellar. This time, he’s in a differently structured show and playing a lot more characters, and he’s just as stellar. In fact, his feat might even be more impressive considering how quick-moving playwright Becky Mode’s script is, and just how fast the transitions are between the 40-ish different characters Bonfiglio plays. He’s not narrating here, as he was in the show at SDT. Here, the play throws us right into the action as out-of-work actor Sam (Bonfiglio) is working the reservations desk at a highly trendy New York restaurant. The play is structured as such that at first, we are “meeting” so many different characters–difficult customers, restaurant staff, the personal assistants of celebrities, Sam’s friends and family–that we don’t really get to know Sam very much, until his personality and goals are gradually revealed through his various phone conversations. We are allowed to become invested in Sam’s situation as we experience his difficult job along with him, and as he is “encouraged”/taunted by his acting friend/rival Jerry and too-politely avoided by his agent, we see what his real passion is–acting, as he waits to hear the outcome of a recent audition. We also learn of his desire to take a few days off to spend Christmas with his father and siblings, and how that hope is variously ignored and treated as an inconvenience by some of his co-workers. We also get to the see the contrast between how he is treated by co-workers, relatives, friends, and strangers alike, as his day gets busier and busier and occasional respites come in the form of conversation partners who actually listen, realizing the person they are talking to is an actual human being and not merely an obstacle to their own goals. It’s a cleverly structured play that starts out as a simple series of conversations and eventually becomes a story told through those conversations. It’s also hilarious, with fast-paced comedy and broadly drawn characters that give the excellent, versatile Bonfiglio a lot to work with, and he never ceases to impress as he conveys the story, reveals Sam’s distinct character, and manages to become a host of contrasting characters consistently throughout the production.

Although in a real sense, Bonfiglio is the show, he is also ably supported by the top-notch technical aspects of the production. David Blake’s detailed set brings the audience into a vividly realized restaurant basement, which becomes something of a symbol of Sam’s reluctant confinement. There’s also excellent lighting by Elizabeth Lund and sound by Kareem Deanes that contribute to the overall tone of the production. Director Ellie Schwetye’s staging makes excellent use of the whole performance space, as well.

This is one of those shows that provide a prime showcase for a talented performer, and Will Bonfiglio certainly makes the most of that showcase with his excellent timing and winning stage presence. It’s a hilarious show that introduces the audience to a variety of characters, from accepted “types”–the gruff, pompous celebrity chef, the overworked staff, the demanding celebrities, and more–but also reveals a fair amount of depth in the course of a relatively short intermissionless show. There are a lot of laughs here, certainly, but there’s also a clear glimpse of humanity. It’s a gift of a show for the holiday season.

Will Bonfiglio
Photo by Jon Gitchoff
New Jewish Theatre

New Jewish Theatre is presenting Fully Committed at the Marvin & Harlene Wool Studio Theatre at the JCC’s Staenberg Family Complex until December 22, 2019

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Brighton Beach Memoirs
by Neil Simon
Directed by Alan Knoll
New Jewish Theatre
October 10, 2019

Jane Paradise, Jacob Flekier, Laurie McConnell
Photo by Greg Lazerwitz
New Jewish Theatre

New Jewish Theatre is starting a new season with a celebrated work by one of America’s most prolific playwrights, Neil Simon. The first in Simon’s “Eugene Trilogy”, Brighton Beach Memoirs is a semi-autobiographical tale that veers swiftly between comedy and drama at times, but ultimately it’s a poignant and nostalgic coming-of-age story, even if it is dated in places. Especially, this production features a strong cast that makes the most of the comedic and dramatic elements of the story.

The story is set in 1937 in the Brighton Beach area of Brooklyn, New York, and narrated by Simon’s teenage avatar Eugene Morris Jerome (Jacob Flekier). Eugene is an aspiring writer, and this story is part of his “secret” memoir. In addition to his writing ambitions, Eugene is also interested in baseball (particularly the New York Yankees), looks up to his older brother Stanley (Spencer Kruse), and harbors an increasingly intense crush on his older cousin Nora (Summer Baer), who along with her younger sister Laurie (Lydia Mae Foss) and their widowed mother, Blanche (Laurie McConnell) has been living with Eugene’s family. Eugene’s mother Kate (Jane Paradise) is concerned about the well–being of all of her family, including hardworking husband Jack (Chuck Brinkley), her sons, and her younger sister Blanche and her daughters. It’s the Great Depression in America, and the threat of war is looming in Europe, and the family members have their own hopes, goals, and fears, as Eugene deals with puberty and his future goals, Stanley deals with a moral dilemma at his job, Jack deals with financial struggles and the concerns of taking care of a family, as does Kate. There are family conflicts between the lonely Blanche and her aspiring dancer daughter, Nora; between Kate and Blanche who have old issues to settle; between Stanley and his parents, and the expectations set on him by his family; and more. Eugene is the central figure and the narrator, but the primary conflicts are mostly within the rest of the family, as the hardships of the world and expectations and conventions of society are reflected in the conflicts and hardships of the family. It’s an insightful, witty script for the most part, with some fairly intense drama that is built up well, but there are some moments that can come across as jarring for a 2019 audience, especially in the expressed attitudes of Stanley and Eugene toward girls and, particularly, Nora. Still, for the most part this is a poignant and thoughtful comedy/drama, with a hopeful bent toward the end even despite the continuing tensions in the wider world. It’s been described by Simon (as noted in the director’s message in the program) as somewhat of an idealization of his childhood and his family, but nonetheless these characters seem believably real, especially as portrayed by the excellent cast in this production.

As for that cast, each cast member seems especially well-chosen for this production. As Eugene, Flekier is full of energy and enthusiasm, portraying the teenager’s adolescent angst and occasional cluelessness with admirable clarity. There are also fine performances from Kruse as the conflicted Stanley, Baer as the determined Nora, and Foss as the occasionally snarky young Laurie. The adult characters are especially well-played here, as well, with truly remarkable performances from Paradise and McConnell as the contrasting sisters Kate and Blanche, with McConnell especially bringing out a lot of the heartwrenching poignancy of her story. These two are especially believable as siblings, and their scenes together are a highlight of the production. Paradise also has credible chemistry with the also excellent Brinkley as the world-weary, well-meaning Jack. Brinkley’s presence as the strong-but-fair father figure is readily apparent in all his interactions here, especially with his sons. It’s a strong ensemble, representing a believably imperfect but generally loving family unit, reacting to each other and to their times in sometimes humorous, occasionally heartrending ways.

As is usual for NJT, the physical production is top-notch, with a terrific, painstakingly detailed two-level set by Margery and Peter Spack that evokes the era ideally. Michele Friedman Siler’s costumes also fit the period and characters well. There’s also excellent atmospheric lighting by Michael Sullivan, and impressive sound design by Zoe Sullivan, effectively bringing the audience along for the story and into 1930s Brooklyn.

Brighton Beach Memoirs is a well-known show that I hadn’t managed to see before this production, and I’m glad that New Jewish Theatre has given me my “introduction” to this piece on stage. It’s an impressively cast, well-realized production that reflects Simon’s witty and occasionally intense script especially well. I’m finding myself hoping NJT will stage the other two plays in the “Eugene Trilogy” in future seasons, with as much of the same cast as they are able to retain. This is a strong start to a new season for New Jewish Theatre.

Jacob Flekier
Photo by Greg Lazerwitz
New Jewish Theatre

New Jewish Theatre is presenting Brighton Beach Memoirs at the Marvin & Harlene Wool Studio Theatre at the JCC’s Staenberg Family Complex until October 27, 2019

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I Now Pronounce
by Tasha Gordon-Solmon
Directed by Edward Coffield
New Jewish Theatre
May 18, 2019

Graham Emmons, Jessica Kaddish
Photo by Jon Gitchoff
New Jewish Theatre

For the last show of its 2018-2019 season, New Jewish Theatre has invited its audiences to a wedding. Tasha Gordon-Solmon’s I Now Pronounce is probably best described as a comedy with dramatic moments, telling a series of inter-connected stories within the context of one eventful wedding. As directed by NJT’s Artistic Director Edward Coffield, the production is a sometimes poignant, sometimes hilarious, highly memorable event.

The structure of the play is, for the most part, episodic, with stories playing out over the course of one night involving the wedding of Nicole (Jessica Kaddish) and Adam (Graham Emmons), detailing the aftermath of an unexpected and shocking event that happens during the ceremony. An aging, forgetful Rabbi (Craig Neuman) introduces the story with some background information that gets increasingly mixed up as the speech–along with the mimed ceremony–progresses. Then, it’s over, and as familiar “wedding reception”-type songs play over the scene transitions, the story in all its comedy and drama unfolds. We meet the bride and groom, who individually try to deal with the events of the ceremony and its implications for their relationship, as well as the bridesmaids and groomsmen, including the bubbly, adventurous Michelle (Delaney Piggins), the initially more level-headed Eva (Frankie Ferrari), the brash, crass Dave (Will Bonfiglio) and the recently married but lovelorn Seth (Ryan Lawson-Maeske). Through the course of the evening, the characters interact and play out dramas of their own, involving some commonly accepted “wedding story” cliches, but also with some real moments of insight. There’s also a fun concurrent side story involving a trio of flower girls (Millie Edelman, Abby Goldstein, and Lydia Mae Foss) who find their own adventures and offer their own unique perspective of events. Although sometimes it seems like too much is going on at once, ultimately it’s a fun story and a celebration of hope in the midst of chaos and unpredictable life events.

This is an ensemble show, with a fairly broadly characterized cast of characters, and the actors play their parts well. Emmons and Kaddish, as the loving but sometimes combative newlyweds, lead a fine cast of local performers. Also strong are Piggins as the well-meaning but flighty Michelle, Lawson-Maeske as the sullen Seth, well-matched with Ferrari as the seemingly dependable but surprising Eva, and Bonfiglio in a somewhat unusual role for him as the boorish Dave. Neuman has some excellent moments as well, starting off the play memorably as the Rabbi, and young Edelman, Goldstein, and Foss are simply delightful as the flower girls. It’s an excellent, cohesive ensemble with strong chemistry, contributing to the overall comic energy of this production.

The whole wedding atmosphere is represented with authenticity here by means of David Blake’s detailed set, Michele Siler’s meticulously well-suited costumes, and excellent lighting by Tony Anselmo and sound by Amanda Werre. The choice of music throughout the production is especially notable, as well–with hits from ABBA, Cyndi Lauper, and others featured in the transition scenes and seeming especially appropriate for the setting. Director Edward Coffield’s staging is well-paced, as well, building up to a fun, upbeat conclusion.

I Now Pronounce is a memorable conclusion to the season for New Jewish Theatre. It’s not the deepest of stories, but there are some poignant moments and a lot of well-timed comedy. What stands out the most, though, is the top-notch cast. The curtain call is a real treat, as well.

Ryan Lawson-Maeske, Will Bonfiglio, Graham Emmons
Photo by Jon Gitchoff
New Jewish Theatre

New Jewish Theatre is presenting I Now Pronouce at the Marvin & Harlene Wool Studio Theatre at the JCC’s Staenberg Family Complex until June 2, 2019

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Time Stands Still
by Donald Margulies
Directed by Doug Finlayson
New Jewish Theatre
March 28, 2019

Ben Nordstrom, Wendy Greenwood
Photo by Phillip Hamer
New Jewish Theatre

New Jewish Theatre’s latest production is a look at relationships in several different aspects. Time Stands Still examines romantic relationships, as well as a people’s relationships with their work and their callings in life. It’s also an especially timely play in terms of its subject matter in various ways. On stage in St. Louis, NJT’s production is particularly compelling and impeccably cast.

The play and this production are notable for their realism. The first thing that stands out, even before the action begins, is John Stark’s detailed set that accurately represents a small but well-appointed Brooklyn loft. Playwright Donald Margulies is also meticulous in his script, with richly defined characters and vivid, emotional, and highly credible dialogue, tracking what seems to be about a year in the lives of the characters, who are both journalists. Sarah (Wendy Greenwood), a photographer, and her boyfriend, reporter James (Ben Nordstrom), live together in the loft, but they have apparently spent little time there recently as both had been on assignment in the Middle East, although James had come home earlier than Sarah. The play begins as Sarah, who was wounded in a bombing shortly after James left, returns home, and the two try to settle into a more “normal” life away from the dangers of war zones as Sarah recovers from her injury and James tries to finish several writing projects. They’re also struggling in various ways with how to resume–and define–their relationship following various traumatic events. Meanwhile, their friend and magazine editor Richard (Jerry Vogel) encourages them in documenting their experiences and also introduces his new, younger girlfriend Mandy (Eileen Engel), an event planner whose outlook on life is decidedly different from theirs.  The play deftly examines various themes–the dynamics of relationships and how career goals, life attitudes, and traumatic events can affect them, as well as artists’ and writers’ relationship with their art and also questions concerning covering troubling world events and whether or not that coverage makes a difference in public perception and encouraging activism and change. These seem like a lot of topics to cover in one play, but Margulies manages to do so in a seamless way while making the characters credible and relatable at the same time.

In terms of credibility, the performances are also essential even with the excellent script. Here, all four cast members are strong, with excellent emotional range from both Greenwood and Nordstrom, who display strong and throughly believable chemistry throughout all stages of their relationship. Vogel and Engel are also impressive, providing a striking contrast and an example for James and Sarah of what they could be if they so chose. The ensemble chemistry is strong and the energy is taut and palpable. It’s a truly impressive cast.

The technical aspects of the production, in addition to the set, are also strong. The excellent, evocative lighting by Michael Sullivan effectively portrays the change in seasons and passage of time, as well as setting the mood in various scenes. The costumes by Michele Siler are suitable and, as in keeping with the general tone of the play, realistic as well. The play is set in 2009, and there are some nice little touches like the small flat-screen TV that help to convey the sense of time and place.. There’s also crisp sound design by Zoe Sullivan.

Time Stands Still is an intense, thought-provoking play. It’s a highly emotional, vivid portrayal of characters who have been in intense situations and have differing reactions and life goals. On stage at New Jewish Theatre, it’s a memorable and compelling theatrical experience.

Wendy Greenwood, Jerry Vogel, Ben Nordstrom, Eileen Engel
Photo by Phillip Hamer
New Jewish Theatre

New Jewish Theatre is presenting Time Stands Still at the Marvin & Harlene Wool Studio Theatre at the JCC’s Staenberg Family Complex until April 14, 2019

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District Merchants
by Aaron Posner
Directed by Jacqueline Thompson
New Jewish Theatre
January 24, 2019

J. Samuel Davis
Photo by Eric Woolsey
New Jewish Theatre

For their latest production, New Jewish Theatre is staging another literary inspired comedy by Aaron Posner. Like last year’s Chekhov-based Life Sucks, District Merchants takes a new look at its inspiration–this time Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice–and re-imagines the characters and situations in a new setting. It’s a new look at an much-studied and problematic classic that honors its source material while simultaneously challenging and reinventing it.

The story is now set in Washington, DC and Massachusetts in the 1870s. The Civil War is over, slavery is outlawed, but racial tensions and injustices remain. The central figures, who address the audience to introduce themselves at the beginning of the show, are Jewish moneylender Shylock (Gary Wayne Barker), and Antoine (J. Samuel Davis), a black businessman who was born free, and who borrows money from Shylock to help his young friend, Benjamin Bassanio (Rob White) woo a wealthy young woman named Portia (Courtney Bailey Parker). That all sounds like The Merchant of Venice, essentially, but there are notable twists. There are some important things Benjamin hasn’t told Antoine about Portia, and about the manner in which he’s going about pursuing her. Shylock, for his part, is given a lot more backstory, and is a more sympathetic character, although he’s overprotective of his daughter Jessica (Alicen Moser), leading to her wanting to leave his house for good. She’s also attracted to Finn (Paul Edwards), a young Irish immigrant who has ulterior motives for pursuing Jessica, at least at first. Portia, in the meantime, wants to go to Harvard law school and become a lawyer, but she’s not allowed because she’s a woman. That doesn’t stop her, though. Meanwhile, Portia’s longtime maid and confidante Nessa (Rae Davis) is aware of more than she lets on, and challenges Portia on her own biases. There’s also Lancelot (Karl Hawkins), Shylock’s household servant who sympathizes to degrees with both Shylock and Jessica and finds himself in the middle of all the disputes. That’s the setup, really, but there’s a whole lot that goes on here that I won’t spoil. It follows the basic framework of The Merchant of Venice in a lot of ways, but also deviates from that plot in several important ways. Several key speeches from Shakespeare are included, as well, especially notable speeches for Shylock and Portia.

This is a fascinating twist on the source material, which has been subject for controversy and criticism over the years, especially in its treatment of Shylock and Jewish people in general. Here, the twist is that nobody is in the dominant social group in 1870s society. The main characters are Jewish or black, and there’s also the Irish Finn, and Portia who is wealthy and white, but as a woman isn’t allowed to pursue the career she desires, and is expected to make an advantageous marriage. The tensions represented here are personal as well as societal, and larger issues of systemic injustice are also emphasized, with some fourth-wall breaking and direct challenges to the 2019 audience. The tone is still, for the most part, comic, but there’s some poignant drama here, as well, particularly in the expanded backstory of Shylock, which gives his reasons for sheltering his daughter and demanding his “pound of flesh” from Antoine. The dynamics of all the relationships are turned around, but ultimately it’s a comedy and there is still hope.

The staging by director Jacqueline Thompson is fast-paced and dynamic, and the cast assembled here is truly excellent. Davis and Barker are the central figures, and both are terrific. Barker’s Shylock is guarded, insecure, but also proud at the same time, and Davis displays considerable presence as the determined Antoine. Both men energize the stage when they are on it, and their scenes together are especially memorable. There are also impressive performances from White and Parker, who display strong chemistry as Benjamin and Portia; and Moser and Edwards, with equally strong chemistry as Jessica and Finn. Davis, as the witty, occasionally snarky Nessa, and Hawkins as Lancelot also display good chemistry and excellent comic timing. It’s a cohesive ensemble all around, bringing a lot of humor, as well as depth to their portrayals.

Technically, this production is a wonder, with a stunning multilevel set by David Blake and meticulously detailed period costumes by Felia Davenport. Sean Savoie’s lighting also contributes effectively to the mood and tone of the production, as do Zoe Sullivan’s sound and projection, helping to transport the audience back to a different, fully realized time and place.

District Merchants is a funny play, but also poignant and challenging. It takes a well-known Shakespearean tale and turns it around, bringing new depth to the relationships and situations. It also boasts a first-rate cast of local performers. It’s another impressive, intriguing comedy by Aaron Posner, given a remarkable production at New Jewish Theatre.

Gary Wayne Barker
Photo by Eric Woolsey
New Jewish Theatre

New Jewish Theatre is presenting District Merchants at the Marvin & Harlene Wool Studio Theatre at the JCC’s Staenberg Family Complex until February 10, 2019.

 

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An Act of God
by David Javerbaum
Directed by Edward Coffield
New Jewish Theatre
November 29, 2018

Cassidy Flynn, Alan Knoll, Amanda Wales
Photo by Eric Woolsey
New Jewish Theatre

It’s kind of like a cross between a late-night cable access show and a Netflix comedy special, but the host is God. An Act of God is New Jewish Theatre’s latest production, featuring a well-loved local actor and a lot of joking, philosophizing, and a whole lot of snark. It’s a short play, running a little over an hour with no intermission, and it succeeds mostly because of personality and attitude, although its philosophical musings range from the mildly thought-provoking to the “been there, heard that”.

The play is written by playwright, author, and television writer David Javerbaum, who is also responsible for the Twiter account @TheTweetofGod. If you’ve read his Twitter, you’ll have a fairly good idea of what this rendition of God, played by Alan Knoll, is going to say. The premise is that God has a message for the people of earth, and so he inhabits the body of “St. Louis theatre treasure” Knoll to give his presentation, assisted by two angels, Michael (Cassidy Flynn), and Gabriel (Amanda Wales). Apparently, the Supreme Being has decided that his original Ten Commandments are obsolete (or, at least, most of them are) and he’s now here to present a new, improved set for the modern world. I won’t give them all away, but they are accompanied by explanations and commentary, in which he provides an explanation, including revised take on well-known Bible stories and concepts, coming across largely as sometimes charming, sometimes witty, frequently snarky, and not a little bit vain, giving answers to age-old questions in a sometimes thought-provoking and sometimes smug way. Depending on your personal religious beliefs, this can range from funny to annoying, but one thing it definitely is is irreverent.

The play is most effective as a showcase for Knoll, who lends his strong, amiable stage presence to this larger-than-life, occasionally apologetic, more-than-occasionally confrontational and capricious portrayal of God. It’s an energetic, well-timed comic performance that makes the most of the material Knoll is given. He also has strong chemistry with his angels–the equally excellent Flynn as the increasingly challenging and questioning Michael, who fields questions from the audience (sort of), and Wales as the devoted, more childlike Gabriel, who reads the Bible passages as needed. They’re performing on a well-realized set by Josh Smith that resembles the brick-wall-backed stage of a comedy club, and they’re whimsically outfitted by costume designer Michele Friedman Siler. The lighting by Josh Smith, sound by Amanda Were, and projection design by Michael Perkins also support the production well, helping to create and maintain the irreverent, comedy-club type atmosphere. There are even some tables in the front where audience members can sit.

An Act of God is not for everyone, but it’s an excellent showcase for its leading performer. It’s a funny, sometimes crass, sometimes confrontational exploration of the way God and religion has been viewed, and sometimes twisted, over the years. Depending on your own personal views, that challenge can be seen as incisive, simplistic, or incomplete, but it’s certainly not boring. It’s not exactly divine, but it’s comedy, with a strong personality at its heart.

Alan Knoll
Photo by Eric Woolsey
New Jewish Theatre

New Jewish Theatre is presenting An Act of God at the Marvin & Harlene Wool Studio Theatre at the JCC’s Staenberg Family Complex until December 16, 2018

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Raging Skillet
by Jacques Lamarre
Directed by Lee Anne Matthews
New Jewish Theatre
October 4, 2018

Kathleen Sitzer, Sarajane Alverson, Erin Renée Roberts
Photo by Eric Woolsey
New Jewish Theatre

Raging Skillet is the first show I’ve attended where the ushers handed out napkins along with the programs. That’s fitting for a show like this that has the look and feel of a television cooking show. The first show of New Jewish Theatre’s 22nd season and the first season for new Artistic Director Edward Coffield, this is a show that blends story, biography, and immersive elements to create an entertaining and fascinating look at a real life celebrity chef with a penchant for the dramatic in cooking as well as in life.

The setting here genuinely makes the play look like one of those cable cooking shows, where a celebrity chef cooks, tells stories, and is cheered on by an enthusiastic audience. Here, center stage is taken by Chef Rossi (Sarajane Alverson), a caterer with an adventurous and rebellious attitude toward her profession. Rossi is a real person, and she was actually in attendance on opening night, sitting in my row a few seats over from me. Her presence added another “meta” element to this production for me, witnessing a chef watching someone else embodying her story before the audience. The premise is that we, the audience, are attending the launch of Rossi’s book, also called Raging Skillet, which is the name of her catering company. She’s supported by her DJ and sous chef Skillit (Erin Renée Roberts) as she leads a high-energy, interactive presentation supported by the “Rossi Posse” who hand out samples of her culinary creations to the audience as Rossi cooks. Things don’t go exactly to plan, however, as Rossi soon discovers when her mother (Kathleen Sitzer) shows up unannounced with stories of her own. This is especially vexing for Rossi, since her Mom died 25 years previously. So, the Mom figure is a ghost or a memory or projection of Rossi’s subconscious, or some combination of those elements, and as Rossi tells her life story, Mom interrupts a lot, to Rossi’s increased annoyance. The show uses this device to explore various issues in Rossi’s life and what made her who she is today, including her relationship with her mother, her Jewish heritage, her identity as a lesbian, and her unconventional approach to life and her job. It’s not a long show–just over an hour with no intermission, and it’s fast-paced with a lot of humor and some poignant moments as well, especially involving Rossi’s coming to terms with her memories of her mother.

All three members of the cast are excellent, led by Alverson’s brash, confrontational, snarky, and occasionally vulnerable Rossi. Roberts as Skillit plays various roles in the story as needed, including several co-workers of Rossi’s over the years, Rossi’s first girlfriend, and Rossi’s father, and she’s excellent in all of them, especially in her main role, serving as a support and occasional conscience for Rossi. It’s also great to see Sitzer, who retired earlier this year as Artistic Director of NJT, in what almost seems to be a tailor-made role as Rossi’s eccentric, overprotective Mom. Her scenes with Alverson are the highlight of the production, bringing a lot of laughs as well as some more serious moments.

The production design takes the audience into a studio kitchen where Rossi is at work. Dunsi Dai’s detailed set looks like it could be from one of those aforementioned TV cooking shows. There’s also excellent use of sound and projections by Michael Perkins that add a lot to the overall experience and emotion of the show. Michele Friedman Siler’s costumes are ideally suited to the characters, and Michael Sullivan’s lighting suits the “studio kitchen” setting well. This is a play that takes the audience into Rossi’s memories as well as literally into her kitchen, and the production values reflect that suggestion well.

There are moments of this show where it threatens to come across as an infomercial promoting Rossi’s book, which actually is on sale in the lobby after the show. There is an air of promotion about it, but the story and the characters remain the main focus. It’s a funny, whimsical, occasionally poignant and more than occasionally thought-provoking. It’s a great start to a new season and a new era for New Jewish theatre. And the food is good, too!

Sarajane Alverson
Photo by Eric Woolsey
New Jewish Theatre

New Jewish theatre is presenting Raging Skillet at the Marvin & Harlene Wool Studio Theatre at the JCC’s Staenberg Family Complex until October 21, 2018.

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