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Posts Tagged ‘mike dowdy-windsor’

Sweet Smell of Success
Music by Marvin Hamlisch, Lyrics by Craig Carnelia
Book by John Guare
Directed by Scott Miller and Mike Dowdy-Windsor
New Line Theatre
June 3, 2017

Ann Hier, Zachary Allen Farmer, Matt Pentecost
Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg
New Line Theatre

It’s a somewhat obscure musical that had a short run on Broadway, won a few awards and received a mixed critical reception, and it’s based on a movie that’s well-regarded by critics but isn’t exactly a household name. I hadn’t seen the film before seeing New Line’s newest production of Sweet Smell of Success, although I had heard of the film and the musical. Oddly, I don’t think familiarity with the source material matters much in terms of enjoying this show, even though its subject matter revolves heavily around the concept of success, notoriety, and the sheer level of power that can come from being a household name. This is the kind of show that New Line does especially well–a show that might have been too “small” in a sense for Broadway. It’s the kind of show where an intimate presentation in a venue like New Line’s Marcelle Theatre can be ideal, to scale this story down to its most important elements–the characters, the raw emotions, and the key concepts at play in this seedy, sultry, and sometimes downright scary morality tale that focuses on the down side of the quest for fame.

The story takes the audience to New York City in the 1950’s, to a world in which gossip columnist J. J. Hunsecker (Zachary Allen Farmer) exerts his influence through his nationally syndicated and widely read newspaper column. As the ensemble asserts in the opening number, making it into “The Column” is essential for achieving that elusive measure of success for the small nightclubs that host celebrity sightings, the up-and-coming actors and musicians who are looking for their big breaks, and even the press agents who work tirelessly to get their clients mentioned by J.J. One of these press agents is Sidney (Matt Pentecost), who makes call after unheeded call to J. J.’s secretary Madge (Kimi Short) in hopes of getting his only client, the small but ambitious Club Voodoo, a mention. Sidney’s luck doesn’t improve until a chance meeting at the club with an aspiring young actress who turns out to be J.J.’s sister, Susan (Ann Hier), who is indulging in a secret romantic relationship with struggling jazz musician Dallas (Sean Michael). When J. J. himself walks into the club looking for Susan, Sydney tries to help her by pretending to be her friend, and ends up getting J.J.’s notice, which begins Sidney’s  ascent up the ladder to success, at the increasing expense of his own scruples. As J.J.’s true character is revealed, along with his creepy obsession with and sense of control over Susan, Sidney is caught between his desire for celebrity and influence under J.J.’s tutelage and his genuine fondness for Susan and desire to help her. The problem Sidney finds is essentially, how does a person hold onto his own soul after he sells it in the name of success? The consequences turn out to be messy for some, and tragic for others.

The setting and overall atmosphere of this production is masterfully achieved by virtue of strong production values and an ideal setting. As excellent as New Line’s shows have been since moving to the Marcelle, I think this production has been most successful at making the most of this venue.  The small, intimate atmosphere and the meticulously crafted set by Rob Lippert create the ideal mood for this jazzy, dark, and challenging piece of theatre. Lippert’s excellent lighting also contributes to the Noir-ish atmosphere, as do Sarah Porter’s stylish and detailed period costumes. The pacing is strong here, as well, with the mood being tense when it needs to be, and even downright brutal and bleak when necessary as well. There are also some much-needed moments of humor in the midst of the tension, though, and these are also handled well by way of Scott Miller and Mike Dowdy-Windsor’s astute direction and the extremely strong cast that the directors have assembled, as well as the excellent band led by music director Jeffrey Richard Carter, bringing the show’s jazz-influenced score to life with a bold attitude and style.

The focus of much of this play is on the figures of J.J. and Sidney, and both parts are cast well with veteran New Liners. Farmer brings a sense of self-assured determination and a steely resolve to the role of the domineering J.J., as well as a wry sense of humor and a strong voice. His status as the influential power player is unquestioned. Pentecost brings a sense of weary charm to Sidney that makes the viewer want to sympathize with him to a point. His scenes with Farmer and with Hier are particularly memorable. Hier, in the difficult role of the conflicted, dominated Susan, shines as well, bringing a quiet strength to the role that makes itself more clear as the show goes on. Michael, as Susan’s principled secret boyfriend Dallas, is also excellent, displaying a strong tenor voice on “I Cannot Hear the City” and “One Track Mind”. His chemistry with Hier is credible, as well. There’s also a standout performance from New Line veteran Sarah Porter, making an impression is the small but important role of Sidney’s girlfriend, waitress and aspiring actress Rita, who gets the show’s single best solo musical moment with “Rita’s Tune”. Kent Coffel as corrupt police Lt. Kello, Jason Blackburn as rival gossip columnist Otis Elwell, and Short as J.J.’s no-nonsense secretary Madge lend excellent support as well, as does the show’s cohesive ensemble, playing a range of New Yorkers and contributing to memorable musical numbers like the intro and the energetic, sharp and chilling “Dirt”.

This is a challenging, incisive story with an incisive message, richly drawn characters, and even more richly drawn settings. It’s an homage to Film Noir, tied to its time in one way, but surprisingly timeless in another, since the modes of communication and the names may change over the years, but human nature hasn’t changed, and neither have the temptations that come with the thirst for knowledge, influence, and especially power and control. Sweet Smell of Success isn’t always sweet, but at New Line and with this cast and creative team, it’s certainly a success.

Cast of Sweet Smell of Success
Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg
New Line Theatre

New Line Theatre is presenting Sweet Smell of Success at the Marcelle Theatre until June 24, 2017.

 

 

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Zorba
Lyrics by Fred Ebb, Music by John Kander
Book by Joseph Stein, based on the novel by Nikos Kazantzakis
Directed by Scott Miller and Mike Dowdy-Windsor
New Line Theatre
March 3, 2017

zorba1

Margeau Steinau, Dominic Dowdy-Windsor, Kent Coffel Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg New Line Theatre

One of the key lines from the Kander and Ebb musical Zorba is sung near the beginning of the show–“life is what you do when you’re waiting to die”. Currently on stage at New Line Theatre, Zorba shows its audience life in all its beauty and brutality.  At New Line, it’s presented with the usual strong cast and excellent singing, bringing this sometimes challenging show to vibrant life.

Zorba is an entertaining show, but it can also be kind of stark and brutal. It follows two central characters. The young, scholarly Nikos (Dominic Dowdy-Windsor), is full of idealism as he heads to a small Greek town to manage a mine he has inherited.  He meets the show’s title character, the older, boisterous Zorba (Kent Coffel) in a bar and brings him along to help him run the mine. This begins a relationship in which the younger Nikos is taught the realities of life and the more world-wise Zorba teaches as well as learning a thing or two. It’s structured as a “story within a story” that starts in the bar, narrated by a figure identified as Leader (Lindsey Jones), who reappears at various times throughout the course of the show. Through the course of the story, Nikos and Zorba encounter the local villagers and enter into complicated relationships with local women both dealing with loneliness in their own ways. There’s the older Madame Hortense (Margeau Steinau), who has had an eventful life and a string of short-lived relationships, who enters into something of a combative relationship with Zorba. There’s also the Widow (Ann Hier), who is ostracized by the local villagers, idealized by an infatuated young man (Evan Fornachon) whom she ignores, and who experiences a halting but powerful attraction to Nikos. The story is told with humor, drama, and occasionally a kind of harshness that seems flippant at times, although the music is strong and the characters lively and memorable. Like life, there are moments of beauty as well as of tragedy, although sometimes it seems as if the tragedy isn’t given the weight it should have.

This is a Kander and Ebb show, and as such the music is excellent. From the opening  “Life Is” to that song’s reprise that ends the show, there are many memorable songs, from Zorba’s rousing “The First Time” to his anthemic “I Am Free”, to Madame Hortense’s poignant “Only Love” and “Happy Birthday”. It’s a good script as well, for the most part, but at New Line it’s the performances that make the show, and especially those of the leads. Coffel is an ideal Zorba, with energy and charisma and wit, bringing this larger-than-life character to the stage with charm and veracity. There’s also Dowdy-Windsor as an especially sympathetic Nikos, and his scenes with Coffel are a real highlight of the show. Steinau is also a particular standout as the determined, lovestruck Madame Hortense, and Hier makes the most of the somewhat underwritten role of the Widow. Jones has a strong voice and presence as the Leader, as well, and Fornachon makes a sensitive impression as Pavli, the young man who is infatuated with the Widow.  These players are backed up by a cohesive ensemble, as well, although sometimes there can be a lack of energy in the more dramatic ensemble scenes. Overall, however it’s a strong cast, highlighted by the first-rate singing that New Line is known for.

Technically, the show is in good hands as well. Rob Lippert’s lighting and colorful set with pillars and a vivid Greek-village backdrop help to set the mood and tone of the show well, along with Sarah Porter’s excellent costumes. There’s also a superb band conducted by Sarah Nelson, doing justice to Kander and Ebb’s excellent score.  Michelle Sauer’s choreography is full of energy and true to the music and style of the show, well executed by the strong ensemble.

Zorba is a well-known story, as it was a book and a celebrated film before it was a musical. The musical, however, is my introduction to the story. Although its philosophy does seem to veer towards the harsh at times, it’s also a celebration of the beauty and messiness of life itself. At New Line, this show is brought to the stage with energy, intelligence, and an especially strong cast in the leading roles. It’s definitely a show worth seeing.

zorba2

Lindsey Jones (center) and Company Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg New Line Theatre

 New Line Theatre is presenting Zorba at the Marcelle Theatre until March 25, 2107.

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Celebration
Words by Tom Jones, Music by Harvey Schmidt
Directed by Scott Miller and Mike Dowdy-Windsor
New Line Theatre
September 30, 2016

Sean Michael, Kent Coffel, Zachary Allen Farmer Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg New Line Theatre

Sean Michael, Kent Coffel, Zachary Allen Farmer
Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg
New Line Theatre

Celebration is an unusual musical, but unusual musicals are what New Line Theatre does best.  Tom Jones and Harvey Schmidt’s 1969 “experimental” musical is the latest production at this (pun intended) celebrated St. Louis theatre company, and true to form it’s a memorable, colorful, extremely well-sung production. I also can’t imagine better casting for this particular show.

The structure of this show is highly symbolic and allegorical. With four main characters basically representing the four seasons, it’s based on ancient legends and rituals and framed as the preparation for a New Year’s Eve party, ushering in a new year as a mysterious newcomer arrives to shake up the status quo. The master of ceremonies for this story is Potemkin (Kent Coffel), a rough-around-the-edges trickster who introduces the audience to the setting of the play, a somewhat bare city street corner that becomes the background for the ensuing celebration. The story continues as a newcomer arrives, identified only as “Orphan” (Sean Michael). Orphan grew up in a more rural setting, and he’s arrived ostensibly to save the land and garden where he grew up from a ruthless, filthy-rich businessman, William Rosebud Rich (Zachary Allen Farmer), who seems to own basically everything. He also meets Angel (Larissa White), an aspiring singer and actress who attracts the attentions of both Orphan and Rich, and although she’s attracted to Orphan, she sees Rich as more advantageous to furthering her own career goals.  The struggle between Orphan and Rich for power and influence is the central conflict, with Angel, Potemkin, and the chorus of revelers caught in the middle.

Structure-wise, this is an intriguing show, with memorable characters and a fairly straightforward theme, although the ending is extremely abrupt. I’m also not entirely comfortable with the idea of the woman being the main “prize” to be fought for among the two male adversaries. Still, it’s all symbolism, and the characters are well-realized. The atmosphere is very reminiscent of other shows from its era, especially musically, with memorable musical numbers such as the title song, “My Garden”, and “It’s You Who Makes Me Young.” New Line’s production also has the benefit of what I consider to be ideal casting of the main parts.

The casting is so great, in fact, that I can’t easily imagine who else could have played these roles. Coffel, as the crusty, wily, opportunistic and worldly-wise Potemkin, is full of energy and mischievous charm. He makes a fitting tour guide to the proceedings. Michael’s Orphan is amiable, appropriately naive and optimistic at first, but he also portrays a believable sense of growth and determination as the story progresses. He also has a great tenor voice that suits his songs particularly well. White, as Angel, is also excellent, with a strong voice and believable chemistry with Michael. She makes the character’s dilemma easier to believe. Last but definitely not least is Farmer, who hams it up with gleeful abandon as the slimy, entitled Rich, who clearly sees himself as the hero of the story even though his time is clearly running out. The interplay between all four characters is a major highlight of this production, and they are backed by an excellent ensemble of rowdy revelers to contribute to the overall primal atmosphere of the show.

Visually, this production is spectacular and richly detailed. The somewhat sparse set by Rob Lippert –essentially a series of stacked platforms with a trash can and street lamp at center–is an excellent backdrop for the action of the show, and Sarah Porter’s costumes are truly spectacular. From Rich’s shiny bathrobe and Donald Trump wig, to Orphan’s more simple rustic garb, to the outlandish costumes of Angel and the revelers, everything suits the production just right. Along with Kenneth Zinkl’s striking lighting, Scott L. Schoonover’s distinctive masks for the revelers, Michelle Sauer’s energetic choreography, and the excellent band led by Sarah Nelson, the theme and mood of the production is stylishly presented, lending much to the overall entertainment value of the production and augmenting the performances of the excellent cast.

Overall, I would say Celebration is an entertaining production inventively staged. It’s not for everyone, as like almost all of New Line’s shows, this is for mature audiences. For the most part, Celebration is a witty, energetic, and extremely well-cast show that’s well worth checking out.

Sean Michael, Larissa White Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg New Line Theatre

Sean Michael, Larissa White
Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg
New Line Theatre

New Line Theatre is presenting Celebration at the Marcelle Theatre in Grand Center until October 22, 2016.

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Tell Me On a Sunday
Music by Andrew Lloyd Webber
Lyrics by Don Black and Richard Maltby, Jr.
Directed by Mike Dowdy-Windsor
New Line Theatre
August 13, 2016

Sarah Porter Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg New Line Theatre

Sarah Porter
Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg
New Line Theatre

Tell Me On a Sunday is a challenging show. It’s a one-woman production, and a musical at that, with many songs and no spoken dialogue. It tells a story entirely through song, and it requires a personable actress with a great voice and loads of stage presence. New Line Theatre has chosen the right performer in veteran New Liner Sarah Porter, who brings a lot of energy and heart to this memorable score and intriguing story.

The one-act musical follows the story of Emma (Porter), an English expat living in the United States. Spending time mostly in New York with a short detour to Los Angeles, Emma navigates her way through culture shock, a quest for her Green Card, and a series of relationships with a variety of men. The events are punctuated with a succession of letters to her mother, in which Emma tries her best to explain her emotions and  her thought processes. She also sings to the audience, who serve as stand-ins for various people in her life, from her boyfriends to curious and sometimes gossipy friends. It features a memorable score with some well-known songs such as the melancholy title song, the ballad “Unexpected Song”, and the confrontational “Take that Look Off Your Face”.

Porter handles the songs and story with excellent range, in both singing and acting. She brings the audience along on Emma’s emotional journey, exploring the discoveries of new love, exploring a new country, and issues of personal identity and dependence in her successive relationships. The songs range from happy to humorous, wistful to angry, and Porter not only delivers the material with strength and energy–she presents the character with all of her degrees of complexity, making her at once intriguing and relatable. This is one of those “showcase” type of shows, giving the performer a chance to shine throughout the entire duration of the show, and Porter certainly does shine. It’s a remarkable performance, played out with an impressively believable English accent, as well.

Porter notably also designed the costumes for this production, excellently. She changes outfits several times throughout the show, and each one is well-chosen for each particular moment, reflecting Emma’s personality and her journey of self-discovery. There’s also a richly decorated set and lighting by Rob Lippert that sets the tone and mood of the production well, from the New York scenes to the brief sojourn in LA. Due credit should also go to props master Kimi Short, Sound Designer Benjamin Roseman, and dialect coach Laurie McConnell for their vital contributions to the production, as well as the entire technical crew.

With all the songs and  no spoken lines, this is a show that could easily come across as more of a concert than a play, but thanks to the clever, dynamic staging of director Mike Dowdy-Windsor and Porter’s superb performance, that doesn’t happen here. This is a fully staged, fascinating story, centered around a complex character who is learning about herself as she learns about her world and her relationships. There’s a lot to talk and think about, as well as some real humor and drama. It’s not a long production, running at just over one hour, but it’s a thoroughly engaging hour.

Sarah Porter Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg New Line Theatre

Sarah Porter
Photo by Jill Ritter Lindberg
New Line Theatre

Tell Me On a Sunday is being presented by New Line Theatre at the Marcelle Theatre until August 27, 2016.

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